How to Run in the Cold – New Video

A few simple tips to help you run in the cold

Running in the cold

If you’re anything like me, you dread running in cold weather. The freezing wind, the feeling of a wet shirt on my skin and the loss of feeling in my extremities all have driven me indoors in past winters. Until now. These tips on how to run in the cold will have you out on the beaten path again, no matter the temperature. Check out the latest video from Fresh Brew Run Club:

Tip #1: Dress for the Occasion

It may seem smart to layer up in cold weather, but this only creates problems down the line. As your run progresses, you will naturally warm up, start sweating and enjoy the horrors of a cold, wet shirt. Instead of packing on the layers, keep it simple. Try a base layer or two paired with a good windbreaker. Most of the cold you feel is from the wind, so eliminating contact with Jack Frost will keep you warm and dry.

Tip #2: Protect Ya Extremities

Avoid frostbite and general pain by wearing a hat, gloves and warm socks. Typically these areas of your body can feel the coldest, so covering up your head, hands and feet helps to stay warm on a run. Plus, if you get too hot, you can always put your gloves and hat in a pocket.

Tip #3: Don’t Ignore the Warmup

It may be tempting to leave your home and try to start running as soon as possible to get warm, but easing into your workout is the best way to avoid injuries and general shock to your system. I prefer a dynamic warmup instead of stretching, followed by a short warmup jog at a slow pace. It’s also a good idea to start out slow, the build up your pace about a mile or so into the run, so you are fully warmed up when you really want to push the pace.

Tip #4: Stay Hydrated

Hydration isn’t just important when it’s 95 degrees and the sun is beating down on you. Be sure to drink plenty of water before and after your run in order to hit optimal performance. I like using a low-sugar sports mix. Dehydration can occur in wet and cold weather, so make sure you aren’t neglecting that water bottle!

Tip #5: Cool Down

Just like the importance of warming up, it is also crucial to do a cool down. While it might seem counterintuitive to “cool down” in cold weather, it is a crucial part of your body’s recovery process. This can be as simple as a slow jog after your run, or some additional dynamic stretching. A cheap foam roller or one of those fancy massage guns will also get your muscles primed for recovery.

That’s just a few of my tips for how to run in the cold; do you have any of your own?

Be sure to like and subscribe to Fresh Brew Run Club on YouTube, and check out a few of our other videos today!

Nike React Miler 2 Official Images

Here’s a first look at the Nike React Miler 2

Thanks to the IG account @rungearrun, we now have official images of the Nike React Miler 2. The first version of the Miler (which I reviewed here) has become one of my favorite long-run shoes, and the latest version looks to improve on that solid base. The first version worked great as a stability shoe, with it’s wide base and durable React foam.

Updated Upper

The update appears to be on the upper (top part of the shoe), which includes what looks like improved ventilation. My biggest gripe with the original was the complete lack of ventilation, so this appears to be a much-needed update. The midsole appears to be the same as last year. The tongue and lacing system look very similar compared to the original shoe.

Nike typically operates in two-year cycles, first updating the upper, then redesigning the midsole. Currently, the Pegasus 38 is getting a refreshed upper as well, leaving the possibility for a redesigned midsole in the Pegasus 39.

Photos

Check out the first official images of the Nike React Miler 2, via rungearrun below, and give them a follow on Instagram for more:

Nike React Miler 2
Nike React Miler 2 via @rungearrun
Nike React Miler 2
Nike React Miler 2 via @rungearrun
Nike React Miler 2
Nike React Miler 2 via @rungearrun

Release Date

There is no official release date yet, but based on last year’s release and the current cycle for Nike, look for these to hit shelves late spring.

New Video: RUNNING WITH A BACKPACK – What’s in my bag

A piping hot brew of new video is here. In today’s video, I explain why I haven’t been completely honest with my audience and what I put in my running backpack. The answer might surprise you.

Don’t forget to like and subscribe! Thanks for watching!

Check out my other videos here.

Nike Pegasus 38 Official Images

Official Images of the Nike Pegasus 38

NikeTalk user TC1900 posted new official images of the upcoming Nike Pegasus 38. What are your thoughts?

Nike Pegasus 38
Nike Pegasus 38
Nike Pegasus 38
Nike Pegasus 38
Nike Pegasus 38

Here’s a first look at the Nike Pegasus 38

The Nike Pegasus 38 is the next iteration of one of Nike’s most popular running shoes. After a significant refresh with the Pegasus 37, the 38 is poised to build on that solid base without many major changes. The midsole looks to be the same, with updates to the upper.

Thanks to the Twitter account Rolows_13, we have an initial image of the shoe:

Nike Pegasus 38
Image via @Rolows_13

Redesigned Upper

Based in the leaked image, the midsole appears to be the same as the Pegasus 37, but there does appear to be a new upper. The 37 had a full mesh material on the upper, but the 38 appears to have several different materials. The Swoosh is bigger and it looks like there might be some reflective elements on the updated version.

Release Date

According to Nike, “The Nike Air Zoom Pegasus 38 releases to Nike Members April 15 in Europe, April 22 in North America and April 29 globally.”

Reactions

Some of the initial reactions from LetsRun.com were mixed:

“I like my 37 so have a good feeling about these ones” -fwnvbjkbjsd

“I don’t see the point in it myself. It is good for long slow runs but nothing else. The boston and even reebok shoes are far better (and much lighter).” -ozzyosbournesdentures

“I don’t get what they’re doing with that heel. On my Peg 37s with about 350 miles, the last 2cm or so of the heel looks untouched. There’s a decent amount of foam in the rear of the shoe that seems completely unnecessary. It’s just extra weight.” -shuffleshuffle

Click here for more shoe reviews.

Check out the Fresh Brew Run Club on YouTube.

How to build a treadmill at home

In a DIY, workout from home world, here’s how to build a treadmill.

Some helpful advice for figuring out how to build a treadmill at home.

How to build a treadmill

How to Build a Treadmill Step 1: Arrival

The treadmill will arrive at your house at the most inconvenient time possible. The crew will take a single glance at your door and claim the treadmill won’t fit and they can’t bring it inside. The crew will note “be careful with that computer” and point in a vague direction of the box. It’s unclear what they are referring to, but it sounds fragile. More on this later. The crew leaves, off to the next delivery, and you’re stranded with an overwhelming sense of panic.

Step 2: Getting it Inside

You are forced to bring it in yourself, which involves opening the box on your porch in sub-freezing temperatures and calling an unlucky friend to lug the individual pieces into your house. You’ll probably scrape the wall, but it’s ok, you don’t plan on staying in your house forever.

Step 3: Unboxing

Once the main pieces are in your house and you’ve shooed away your friend, you must unbox and unwrap the rest of the treadmill. You go piece by piece until you make a devastating discovery. The hardware package contains not one, but two allen wrenches. Some historians estimate that the screw was invented in 400 BC and the bolt appeared sometime around 1400 AD, but those two inventions and the thousands of subsequent improvements and tools to use them were apparently missed by the treadmill company, who chose to use the same hardware as a $9 mass produced cardboard Swedish end table. Get a towel for the bloody knuckles in your future.

Step 4: Organizing

After unboxing everything, the room will look like a refrigerator factory exploded, but this is normal. Separate all the parts into random piles so you have enough room to walk around without taking a metal part to the shins.

Step 5: Get an Engineering Degree to Read the Directions

You might want to take a quick pitstop, enroll in a local university and spend four years studying engineering in order to fully understand what the directions are telling you. Because without years of training, many decisions in the construction process will simply come down to best guesses and hoping for the best.

Step 6: Regret

You will eventually get to a point where you regret this entire endeavor, as the project is now getting the best of you. What even is the point of running anyway? Might as well take up something like bird watching or stamp collecting, both of which do not involve directions in 413 languages

Step 7: This Part Doesn’t Fit

At some point during the install, you’ll realize that a part just doesn’t fit. After frustratingly trying to attach and re-attach the part, you’ll take to the internet to discover that many people before you have faced the same solution. And the best conclusion is simply to deal with the fact that the part just doesn’t quite fit right. “It won’t hurt the structural integrity of the treadmill,” one commenter on Reddit will tell you. So grab a hammer and smash those parts together.

Step 8: Become an IT professional

Remember that computer the delivery guys told you about? Well it’s not so much a computer, but rather some kind of Android tablet that needs to be activated once you power up the treadmill. This includes a very slow hardware update, connecting to wifi and logging in to your treadmill brand’s website to activate. You know, how everyone loves to start a run. After divulging your deepest personal derails in the registration process, you are ready to run.

Step 9: Turn on Treadmill

After the construction and setup, flip the switch and listen to the sweet hum of success, as your new treadmill is ready to go. Just keep an eye on that left handrail, it’s pretty loose. Maybe even grab a new pair of shoes for the run. I recommend the Nike Pegasus Turbo. Happy running!